Beth Anderson

“The range of electromagnetic energy we see is only a small part of the energy that’s out there.
When I say I paint what I see, I am meaning it in the sense of, ”I see what you mean”.
Abstraction provides for the artist a means of exploration between what is visible and the mystery of the unknown; that which moves with intuition toward spontaneity and surprise. And the wonderful jolt of pleasure when surprise leads to recognition in the deepest part of the self.
Art is the celebration of the consciousness of life.”

I was born in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1938. My parents divorced before I was 5 and I
lived in various children’s homes, but the one constant in my life as I was growing up was
my love of drawing. As a teenager I made watercolor fashion sketches, which led to a 2
year scholarship at Washington University in St. Louis, followed by a 2 year scholarship to the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. After graduating I designed children’s clothes in NYC, and in 1963 moved to San Francisco and designed sports clothes for Arnelle of California.

In 1966, I became a mom and had fun designing clothes for my daughter. Her father was a painter, and our neighbor, a sculptor who had studied ceramics in Japan. He taught me slab construction ceramics, made from clay he had discovered beside the road.

ln 2000-2002, I took oil painting classes at the SRJC, until my teacher, Michael Loffredo, declared I was no longer just a student and just needed to keep painting. He believed no one is an artist until they have made at least 100 paintings.

I am currently an active volunteer and member of the Gallery Committee at Occidental Center for the Arts. I am also a member of the Sebastopol Center for the Arts. I have entered work in innumerable shows in both art centers, winning awards and selling paintings.

In 2009, I was one of 2 artists in Domaine Real Estates’ Spring Art Review, selling 6 paintings on opening night. And in 2011, I participated with a fellow artist at the Blue Door Gallery in a 2-month show.

Mysteriously, about the time I moved to Occidental in 1999, spontaneously I began to work abstractly. I also began to bicycle around the county at this time, and began thinking about what I was seeing and being dissatisfied with the idea that a landscape was a small idealized section of nature. But how to represent what is hidden below the soil, and the energy of what is constantly growing and changing, and one’s emotions of gratitude for being part of this landscape? An impossible task, perhaps - but maybe, from time to time, just a hint may appear in a painting as I pass the 100 paintings mark.

“The range of electromagnetic energy we see is only a small part of the energy that’s out there.

When I say I paint what I see, I am meaning it in the sense of, ”I see what you mean”.

Abstraction provides for the artist a means of exploration between what is visible and the mystery of the unknown; that which moves with intuition toward spontaneity and surprise. And the wonderful jolt of pleasure when surprise leads to recognition in the deepest part of the self.

Art is the celebration of the consciousness of life.”

I am greatly inspired by traveling, mostly in Europe, but also, a year ago, in Mexico.